• Filmsnob: Oh, the Horrors

    With the resurgence of ‘80s-style films, roller rinks, and arcades now fashioned as barcades, one has to wonder if it’s the yearning for a more innocent time, without cell phones, always-connected internet, and social media. American Horror Story’s new season is a total ‘80s slasher, complete with the VHS effects.

    If there’s anything missing more from today’s cinema selection, it’s the campy, oft-hilarious, horror schlock of yesteryear.

  • Noteworthy: The Prisoner

    The 1967/68 series "The Prisoner" may not have run long enough to make lists with all the greatest shows in television history. However, these 17 episodes of mysterious drama were enough to inspire generations of shows in its wake. 

    If you were thrilled by multiple puzzle-like threads of "Lost" or the eerie subtext of living in a small interconnected community like "Twin Peaks," you owe it to yourself to find this brief run of a series which still resonates today.

  • Filmsnob: James Bond

    'Three measures of Gordon's, one of vodka, half a measure of Kina Lillet. Shake it very well until it's ice-cold, then add a large thin slice of lemon peel. Got it?'

  • Filmsnob: Toshiro Mifune

    “He was like the ocean. The ocean is boundless but sometimes very turbulent.”

    This month presents a golden opportunity in sharing my admiration for whom I consider the best actor ever, Toshiro Mifune. It's no secret that my favorite film genre is Chanbara, or samurai cinema. 

  • Noteworthy: Hey, DuDE!

    There are but a handful of words in our esteemed lexicon that have traveled the circuitous path from slang to colloquialism to vaunted positioning in the hallowed papyrus pages of the Oxford Dictionary. 

    "Cool" resides here possibly because of its panoply of meanings. Defined as "fashionably attractive or impressive," it still bears the dreaded "informal" moniker and places in third among meanings. (One of today's vast array of equivalents, "dank," still has its original definition still attached. Although "hangry" made it.)

  • FilmSnob: Eyes of Laura Mars

    “And we’ll use murder to sell deodorant.”

    Two years before directing The Empire Strikes Back, Irvin Kershner helmed The Eyes of Laura Mars. Written by upstart John Carpenter, with a torch song by Barbara Streisand, and starring Faye Dunaway, who had recently won an Oscar for Network, this should have been a smash hit when it premiered in 1978. Instead, it joined its brethren in the annals of forgotten film archives. The visual and artistic choices certainly date this film, molding it into a great time capsule period piece. 

  • AWARD SHOW looks TO BE BIGGEST, BEST

    When Signature Magazine publisher David Gustafson threw out the idea of hosting a Oscar-style, red carpet award show in conjunction with FestivalSouth’s annual ‘Best of the Pine Belt’ competition five years ago, even his own staff raised an eyebrow or two.
    But thanks to their encouragement and hard work – and the overwhelming support of the greater Pine Belt community – the annual Best of the Pine Belt Award Show became a reality and has quickly become one of the biggest and most-talked-about nights of the year.

  • Filmsnob: Miles Doleac

    Homo Universalis – doing important work at home

  • Prologue: Join Us As We Celebrate

    I have been fortunate to be a part of FestivalSouth since its inception. Though I have been involved in many facets of the event, it has been my distinct privilege to serve as artistic director for the past five years. Building on the incredible strengths of our community, FestivalSouth has become synonymous with excellence in the arts, offering programming and representing the wealth of talent we enjoy as a community.

  • Persepolis: Satrapi directs her own story like a seasoned veteran

    Up to 1979, Iran was on a fast track to modernism. The clothing fashions looked straight out of Vogue, and under the monarchy of the Shah, quality of life was improving rapidly. Unfortunately, the Iranian Revolution occurred, orchestrated by religious zealots, and concluded with the American-backed Shah going into exile. Many progressive Muslims were faced with an Islamic conservative power. To this day, the governmental policies do not reflect the will of the Iranian people.

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