• Film Snob: Valley Girl

    A chick from the valley and a punk from the city.

    Released in April 1983, and shot in just 21 days on a shoestring budget that went mostly to cover the soundtrack and where the cast had to provide their own clothes for their characters’ wardrobes, Valley Girl may just be the penultimate story of star-crossed lovers.

    Inspired from Frank Zappa’s song of the same name, the producers had hoped to make a quick buck and gave the director, Martha Coolidge, total creative freedom as long as she promised to include partial nudity.

    Total boob count by the way? Seven.

  • Game Changer

    Photos by Mark Steele

    Roberts family goes all in to make new midtown Corner Market location an experience for local grocery shoppers.

    When the late H. David “Doc” Roberts opened his family’s first grocery store 50 years ago, it’s hard to believe he could have imagined the company’s 50,000 square foot flagship Corner Market store that recently opened in midtown Hattiesburg.

  • Free State Forager

    Photos by Chad Edwards, MCE Photography. 

    If there’s ever a Zombie Apocalypse, you’re going to want to follow Joseph Hosey. But you better get in line behind the roughly 150 to 200 people who have already alerted him they are coming to him. In his own words, “I’m going to have to hide from all the non-zombies, so you better be quick, because I’m not waiting. I’m going to be disappearing.” 

  • Walk It Out

    Working in the fitness industry, I’ve grown very familiar with the New Year, New You crowd. After two months of celebrating the holidays with decadent meals and desserts (my cheesecake recipe boasts a whopping 2 lbs of cream cheese calories - and that’s before you add the toppings), the dropping of the ball on January 1 offers new beginnings, at least for six weeks before Valentine’s Day candy comes to tempt us. If “get fit” has ever been an item to cross of your resolution list, you, too, understand the complete madness that is January at the gym. 

  • Bill Mowers Reinvents Himself to Help Others

    For those who ever doubted the old adage “When one door closes, another one opens,” look no further than Bill Mowers.

    After moving from Boston to Hattiesburg in 2010 to work with high-temperature polymer composites for the United States Department of Defense, Mowers saw the project he was working on at The Accelerator come to an end after funding for that endeavor dried up. Realizing there weren’t many other options in Hattiesburg for someone with a PhD in polymer and organic chemistry, Mowers decided to reinvent himself.

  • A Tynes Family Christmas

    Margaret and David Tynes of Petal got an early start on what has become a number of Christmas traditions while on their honeymoon in Florida 38 years ago. Everywhere they travel they purchase an ornament to bring back.

    That first year the couple bought an ornament – a clear glass pear in which sits a partridge in a pear tree. Each year the ornament has a special place of honor on the couple’s Christmas tree, which up until this year has always been freshly cut. Since building this house, their tree has always been upwards of 12 feet.

  • Dear Santa Baby

    PHOTO BY LEE CAVE, C STUDIO

  • Terry Burke, the Pine Belt's own Saint Nick

    Even young children understand that sometimes during this particularly busy time of year – the holidays – that even Santa needs a helping hand at times.

    In the week’s leading up to Santa’s Christmas Eve jaunt around the world, when the crunch to get the toys made becomes maddening, Santa can’t be everywhere hearing the final wishes of good boys and girls. That’s when he recruits the help of those gentle bearded souls around the world to go out and hear those wishes.

    Enter Terry Burke, a hand-picked Santa helper in the Pine Belt.

  • Orangetheory Fitness

    Back in the spring of this year, when the first of The District at Midtown's shops began to open, I heard rumor of a yet-to-be-named “orange” group exercise facility possibly becoming one the newest tenants in the development. So, when I bumped into Orangetheory® Hattiesburg's owner Scott Russell in the grocery store parking lot, identifiable by his orange-wrapped truck, I immediately requested a chance to check it out. 

  • The Long of the Short Story

    As innocuous as it may seem, given the impending pressure of technology and the diminishing amount of personal time, the short story may be our best choice of literature. In just about 30 minutes, one short story can provide the necessary time away from screens and offer you the meditation you are searching for.

  • Pages