• Luxury Dining at the Hattiesburg Country Club

    On a chilly spring day, three of the regular “Food with Friends” friends missed our fourth friend, brought along another friend, and met up with an old friend for a fabulous dining extravaganza at Hattiesburg Country Club.

    Have I lost you yet?

  • Chef Q&A: Michael Petitto

    Michael Petitto, 54, is originally from Amite, La., where he owned and operated his family's restaurant, Spitale's, from 2002-2012. Spitale's was originally opened in 1921, by Sam Spitale, Michael's grandfather.  Michael is the son of the late Frank and Frances Petitto. He is married to Lori Petitto of Amite, La., and they have a total of six children combined. Michael has four adult children – Michael, Chris, Andy and Kasey. Lori has two adult daughters, Christine and Mikki. They have four grandchildren, Peyton, Cameron, Ty, and Olivia.

  • Doggone Good Time: Dis & Dem

    First impressions are important. You never get a second chance to make a first impression. In a sea of restaurants off Highway 98, in what I like to call “retail-ville,” there is a place I’ve always said I would try, but had yet to finally check it out. Well, I’m happy to report that I have finally eaten at Dis & Dem, and I’m kicking myself for not trying it sooner. 

  • A Taste of Tradition at La Mexicana

    Food With Friends is the perfect way to describe these nights, because my close friends Jamie, Brittany and Allison aren’t the only ones involved. My friends are also behind the scene – offering some well-crafted meals in a sensational atmosphere.

    This time I have the opportunity to write about my friend, Carlos Molina.

  • Glory Bound Gyro (and Great) Company

    Food with Friends is our new direction for the Signature Eats page. Join us as Allison Neville, Evan Curry, Brittany Purvis and Jamie Massengale eat their way across the Pine Belt.

     

  • Good Eats

    Opened in 1984 as a fruit stand, Shady Acres Village has seen a lot of changes through the years.

    And while the family business has modernized with the times, you can still find long-standing recipes and traditions within its walls. Located just north of Hattiesburg on Highway 49, Shady Acres is worth the drive, especially considering that the journey is practically red-light and traffic free, which is a novelty in the Pine Belt these days.

  • Tabella: Meet us at the Big Red Tomato

    It’s that time again, no two ways about it. Yep. We are neck deep in the holidays.

    From the first fun-sized candy bar in October to the last King Cake in February, we’re all caught up in a whirlwind of rich desserts, road trips, visits with the cousins from out of town, shopping and merry-making in general.

    Amidst all the hustle and bustle, we find ourselves craving a cozy spot to gather with family and friends (the ones who promise not to talk about politics until we’re done digesting!), press pause, and share a delicious meal. 

    Psst… We know a place!

  • Signature Magazine's Top Chef

    What’s one ingredient that you can't live without?
    Garlic
     
    What’s your favorite type of music to listen to when cooking?
    Blues and Jazz
     
    What’s your favorite ethnic cuisine?
    Cajun
     
    What’s the strangest request you’ve ever had from a diner?
    Burger cooked for 5 seconds on each side.
     
    What’s the best part about being a cook? 
    Enjoying people’s reaction to food.
     

  • Great food and All that Jazz

    Nelson Haskin Jr. is a busy man. By day, he’s a National Guard recruiter at Camp Shelby. By night, he owns and operates one of Hattiesburg’s newest nightspots and eateries – Blu Jazz Cafe.

    Blu Jazz opened its doors mid-April of this year, but Haskin is no stranger to the Hattiesburg food scene.

    He got his start at Chesterfield’s when he moved to Hattiesburg to attend Southern Miss, and worked his way through the ranks during the next 14 years. He also owned Nelli’s Deli in the Cloverleaf Mall food court. 

    His passion for hospitality has brought him downtown.

  • Southern Miss Dining

    A confession: Between 1996 and 2000, one of us (this is not a full confession!) ate a fried chicken sandwich in the Southern Miss student union three times a week without fail.

     

    It was a good sandwich, to be sure. Utilitarian. A bun, a huge piece of boneless fried chicken, a couple of pickles. It got the job done. A nice full belly to sustain us through a heavy class load and the daily hunt for parking.

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