• Noteworthy: Merry Christmas - Bing holds the record at 50 million copies

    After World War II, music consumption was at an all-time high with the industry making $10 million in 1945. Years of research at Columbia Records led to introduction of the new long-playing LP in 1948. While this format was introduced in both 10" (more familiar to classic 78 fans) and 12" (borrowed from the "soundtrack" records that played along with films in the theatre), by 1951 the MicroGroove 12" was the gold standard. Record company executives like Jim Conkling at Columbia saw the need to use the LP to at least try to satisfy the needs of every consumer possible.

  • Noteworthy: Royal Horses

    The union of Laurel and Hattiesburg is far more than that scenic drive up I-59. First, our sister city was actually founded the same year as Hattiesburg. Also, both municipalities were part and parcel to a lumber boom. Today, we both have flourishing music scenes with artists that regularly merit this perfunctory jaunt.

  • Noteworthy: Ty Trehern

    Southern Miss public relations student Ty Trehern is a man leading two lives. By day, a scholar and active member of the throng at USM. However, on those weekend nights, Trehern is on the road taking his uplifting music to the people. Since releasing his EP "The Sound" earlier this year, Trehern is now seeing audiences sing along with his anthemic songs and each successive gig grows into another larger opportunity.

  • Noteworthy: The Prisoner

    The 1967/68 series "The Prisoner" may not have run long enough to make lists with all the greatest shows in television history. However, these 17 episodes of mysterious drama were enough to inspire generations of shows in its wake. 

    If you were thrilled by multiple puzzle-like threads of "Lost" or the eerie subtext of living in a small interconnected community like "Twin Peaks," you owe it to yourself to find this brief run of a series which still resonates today.

  • Noteworthy: Hey, DuDE!

    There are but a handful of words in our esteemed lexicon that have traveled the circuitous path from slang to colloquialism to vaunted positioning in the hallowed papyrus pages of the Oxford Dictionary. 

    "Cool" resides here possibly because of its panoply of meanings. Defined as "fashionably attractive or impressive," it still bears the dreaded "informal" moniker and places in third among meanings. (One of today's vast array of equivalents, "dank," still has its original definition still attached. Although "hangry" made it.)

  • Noteworthy: Remembering Dr. John and the Importance of NOLA Music

    A city on the Mississippi River, New Orleans has opened its loving arms to a variety of cultures, languages, cuisine, and lifestyles, carefully spreading all of these ingredients into the bouillabaisse that preserves their joie d'vivre. We lost one of the great ambassadors of New Orleans music and culture in Mac Rebennack, a/k/a Dr. John, The Night Tripper. Crowds as far as the camera eye could see gathered together to walk with his spirit just one more time after news spread of his passing at 77. 

  • Noteworthy: Best of the Best

    Before we dive in, let us briefly examine what makes a Greatest Hits truly worthy of its vaunted moniker. Personally, I own four separate Otis Redding compilations, but he does not make the list. Before you come at me with pitchforks, hear me out. Redding, while both amazing and essential, did not have a career long enough (1963-1967) to best encapsulate his stature as both a singer and songwriter. As a singles artists, his songs are ones to return to again and again. However, their progress and growth are best illustrated in one of the numerous Stax Records collections.

  • Noteworthy: Cadie Calhoun is Unhitched

    Photos by Trey Clark

    A little girl. Just 10 years old. One push from her grandmother and one more from her mother made her step forward. Two generations of choir singers in her family, and they told her that she would be an opera singer. Beneath the warm lights of Temple Baptist Church, Cadie Calhoun first sang.

  • Noteworthy: ‘Bubblegum’music blows up

    Ritchie Cordell, Jerry Kasenetz and Jeffry Katz may not be names you know. However "Yummy Yummy Yummy," "Chewy Chewy," and "Hanky Panky" should be familiar. Before K-Pop and boy bands, the pre-adolescence of rock ‘n' roll brought us Bubblegum. After the Beatles cleared the rulebook, Sixties’ record executives saw a huge potential audience in the kids. Too young for newly-alloyed Hard Rock, kids were devouring cereal, sweets and cartoons. A handful of songwriters fed the assembly line of hitmakers from 1967-1972 and Bubblegum was briefly fashionable pop music.

  • The POWER of POWER POP

    When is rock in fashion, but never truly IN fashion?

    Any great YouTube dive into the past will result in a passel of ancient TV performances that reveal more than just music – you also see fashion. In the early Seventies, the Hippie craze simmered and long, bushy hair paired with Technicolor bright clothes became the way to stand out. Whether it was Marc Bolan leading T.Rex with his mixture of dandy and flashy clothes or Robert Plant taking a more earthy look toward its Adonis-like extremes. Rock and fashion proved to be inseparable. 

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